narcissism

If you’re wondering if your partner is a narcissist, you may be onto something. The fact that you’re reading this article indicates that something is amiss in your relationship, and narcissism could very well be the culprit.

Dating a narcissist usually starts off as though your dreams have become reality. You’ve spent a long time envisioning such a happy beginning to your fairy tale and it seems as if you’ve met him.

He comes across as extremely charming and responds to your every need. He is attentive, charismatic, engaging, and affectionate. You think, “Wow! I’ve really landed the best!”

But at some point, you start to see hints of selfishness. Anger. Intolerance. The “what about me” syndrome. He’s turned the tables and now HE’S the most important thing in the relationship.

Manipulation is a vital tool in his game. Though he portrays that he’s “all that”, he really lacks confidence and needs your attention to esteem him. He feels better when you’re at his beck and call. In public, he’ll be the gentleman, but at home, he’ll blow his fuse and degrade you. He’ll belittle you and not even realize he’s doing it.

Here are some other characteristics of a narcissist:

  1. Intense feelings of self-importance.
  2. Is convinced that he is an exceptional human being that can only be understood by people of high-stature.
  3. Has a tendency to exploit people around him.
  4. Believes he has a right to everything.
  5. Unable to relate or identify the feelings of others.
  6. Lack empathy
  7. Constantly needs attention, compliments and flattery.
  8. Feels envy of those doing well yet insist that everyone is envious of him.
  9. Cannot handle criticism well.
  10. Makes you feel crazy for trying to set a boundary.

Can a narcissist change?

The truth is that most narcissists will not be able to recognize their extreme selfishness or wounds. Admitting that they have a personality disorder is almost impossible for most. Do some make the effort? Sure, but it’s few and far in between.

Is treatment available for a narcissist?

Yes, treatment is available for the narcissist should he or she desire to reach out.

Group Therapy – Helps the narcissist acknowledge others as separate beings who feel.

Individual Psychotherapy – Long-term therapy is recommended.

Hospitalization. For severe cases that are self-destructive or have multiple personality disorders.

Recovery from a toxic relationship

Moving on from a destructive relationship is not easy, but it is the first step. Much of the time, you’ve got to cut ties completely before moving on. You may need help. There’s support groups (Codependents Anonymous) and counseling that may help you.

If this resonates with you, it’s time to begin a new journey toward self-love. It’s time to reclaim your power that you’ve given away. To heal old wounds and become strong again. (Or for the first time).

It’s time to take a season and dedicate it TO YOU. Date yourself. Learn about relationships. Make new friends. Try new hobbies. LIVE in freedom and enjoy your life.

We’re here to enjoy our lives; not struggle in toxic relationships.

Need help? Reach out.